at Staglieno

unlike the Vanity of Grief that envelops all of Monumentale in Milano, the vanity at Cimitero Monumentale di Staglieno is quite contained. in this sense, Milano‘s Monumentale offers an edge over Genova‘s. this is because the significant statues are confined to the building in Staglieno, with “regular” headstones graveyards dominating the field. in some ways. this is a good situation because there is no need to compete between the two, and the experiences were complementary. strangely, the best works at Staglieno were those used on the cover artwork for Joy Division‘s releases**. I was hoping that they were chosen for their design goal, rather than being the most exemplary statues at cemeteries yet seen.

[ link ] another video from Staglieno [ on Instagram ]

{** there is a sense that, exposure to the work via a covert artwork, and the music contained therein, would make it the favorite one. however, this is not the case. the Appiani family grave statue is quite magnificent, working at many layers as photographs and paintings can affect one at a museum. }

 

 

the vanity of grief

a second visit to Milano’s Monumentale, and this phrase still rings as the best description. the first visit was 6 hours, until I got kicked out, and this one was still 3 hours. the impact is still there, and unlike appreciating all the statues at a museum like the Louvre. for obvious reasons, despite the vanity of these burials, the emotional impact is quite subjective, regardless of the family that executed such pieces of art for their loved ones. it is the case that every visit is peeling at the layer of the impressionable collective arrangement, and revealing a personal connection to a few graves at a more intense level.

[ links ] more at instagram