Sarah Moon & simplicity

one of my favorite mantras for photography comes from Albert Einstein: « make it simple, but no simpler ». it rings true, yet, in something as objective as mathematics, or even algorithm design, it is quite the challenge: there are no instructions. in the subjective field of photography, the liberty of seeking simplicity can lead to, not only good photographs, but also a discovery of how we see. a friend posted a quote from Sarah Moon:

« I spend my time eliminating things with the hope that there will be something left that will surprise me, that will make me forget I am in a studio, in front of a model I have booked, on a set on which I have spent hours fussing. »

and that is a characteristic to be loved about Sarah Moon, which sits atop the very alluring Polaroid work that she has done. approaching the snap of a photograph with her idea of simplicity is not very simple, and can lead to many photographs not being taken. however, the learning is gained, and subsequently to less clutter to process.

sarahmoon1
by Sarah Moon

Albert Renger-Patzsch

one goes to museum, as one can do here in Paris where there is so much access to photography exhibit. I had not heard of Albert Renger-Patzsch before, though it is clear now that in 1920s he was having some thoughts/approaches on what we would later see from the New Topographics: from the Bechers, all the way to Stephen Shore, but perhaps more to do with the approach of Luigi Ghirri. (I have an uneasy interest in New Topographics, though I will appreciate all the words from Robert Adams, and the words/pictures from Lewis Baltz.) while Albert Renger-Patzsch‘s thought were focused and insightful, his photography did a bit more migration on subject. in the 1920s he was treating subject just as the Czechs’ photographers of the time were doing, and then under a commission, he did a great service to architectural photography. in the photo below, less like what Becher would pursue and more like what Lewis Baltz would do later, there is the strong geometry within the frame— and the shadows brought up to an equal level of importance.

links: to Albert Renger-Patzsch on Wikipedia. New Topographics on Artsy

ARengerPatzsch_15-1100

by Albert Renger-Patzsch.